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Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 02, Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate

Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate

Volcanic risk, Morioka and nearby Mt. Iwate. -- About 60 Japanese volcanoes (approximately ten percent of the world's total) have been active since the seventh century, and Morioka, like many Japanese cities, is susceptible to volcanic hazards. Mt. Iwate, seen here just north of Morioka, is a composite volcano, hence its eruptions are apt to be explosive. Ash fall, ash flows accompanied by burning gases, and lava flows are all possible should Mt. Iwate erupt. Increasing the danger is the fact that newer suburbs of Morioka are expanding on the flat lands toward the base of the volcano.
 
Editorial assistant: Joseph Augustin. Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. -- Please send any questions, comments, or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu -- With reference to this set of images dealing with the geology of Japan, you may wish to contact Dr. Charles Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Geology, Earlham College, email: martich@earlham.edu