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Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 10, Typical steep mountain slopes susceptible to slides and falls, between Morioka and Miyako.

Typical steep mountain slopes susceptible to slides and falls, between Morioka and Miyako

Typical steep mountain slopes susceptible to slides and falls, between Morioka and Miyako. -- The steep mountain slopes that characterize much of Japan, combined with a climate that causes periodic heavy, saturating rainfall, provide ideal sites for landslides. Near volcanoes, thick accumulations of loose, unconsolidated ash may turn to mudflows with the first significant rainfall. In addition, there are frequent earthquakes to shake unstable slopes and act as triggers for landslides. -- Many Japanese towns are located on flat land at the foot of steep slopes and landslide disasters have been numerous. Even if slides do not directly affect settlements, they may disrupt transportation and dam rivers in narrow valleys.
 
Editorial assistant: Joseph Augustin. Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. -- Please send any questions, comments, or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu -- With reference to this set of images dealing with the geology of Japan, you may wish to contact Dr. Charles Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Geology, Earlham College, email: martich@earlham.edu