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Environmental Implications of Japan's Geology 18, Coping with earthquake hazard, use of wood in structures, Morioka.
Coping with earthquake hazard, use of wood in structures, Morioka. -- Wooden structures are more flexible than rigid ones built of brick, adobe or concrete, and are better able to "give" and thus survive ground movement and vibration associated with earthquakes. The Japanese probably learned this through experience long ago, and along with the availability of timber in Japan, this has led to widespread use of wood for constructing even large buildings. This is not without hazard, however, because fire is a common result of damaging earthquakes.
 
Editorial assistant: Joseph Augustin. Collection Librarian: Amy Bryant. -- Please send any questions, comments, or content corrections to Michael Thiedeman, Professor of Art, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 47374 USA. email address: thiedmi@earlham.edu -- With reference to this set of images dealing with the geology of Japan, you may wish to contact Dr. Charles Martin, Professor Emeritus, Department of Geology, Earlham College, email: martich@earlham.edu